Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Fish Floss Bread

I'm a big fan of pork floss. I love to eat them with plain bread, congee, sometimes plain rice and even yummy on its own. Sad to say that the pork floss in Melbourne is different from the ones in Singapore. The Singapore ones are so light and fluffy and the Melbourne ones are much denser and oilier.

From my recent trip back to Singapore, I've brought several packets of fish floss back to Melbourne. You must be thinking...Why is she not bringing back her traditional favourite, pork floss? Why fish floss?

Due to Australian quarantine rules, we are not allowed to bring in any food items that are made from pork and chicken as these products can be potential risk to their farming industries. Apart from this, anything with fish is surprisingly allowed!

Using the sweet bread dough that I have used previously, I've wrapped these soft yummy bread with my "precious" fish floss. Yum!

I'm submitting this post to the event, Aspiring bakers #8, Bread Seduction organized by Jasmine from The Sweetylicious and I hope that this bread is delicious-looking enough to "seduce" you. LOL.

 

 
Here's the recipe for the basic sweet bread dough (gelatinisation method) like the same one that I did before.

This is originally from the book, Magic Bread by Alex Goh.
(with my modification in blue)

Ingredients A
100g bread flour
70g boiling water

Ingredients B
300g bread flour
100g plain flour
80g sugar
6g salt
20g milk powder
9g instant yeast
175g cold water
60g cold eggs
60g butter

Method:
1.Add the boiling water from A into flour, mix until well blended to form dough. Cover and set aside to cool and refrigerate it for at least 12 hours.

2.Mix B until well blended. Add in the cold water and eggs and knead to form rough dough. Add in A and knead until well blended

3.Add in butter till form elastic dough.

4. Let it proof for 40 mins (I did mine for 1hr)

5.Divide the dough into 60g each and mould it round. (I divided mine into 8 pieces.) Let it rest for 10 mins and flatten it (to a long flat shape).
I've made 2 variations of these bread. One is to place fish floss in a row and then roll up the dough so the floss will be in the center of the bread. Another is to scatter the floss on the flatten dough and roll up the dough like a Swiss roll.

6. Place onto a greased pan and proof for 45 mins (I did mine for another 1 hr). Brush with milk or egg wash. Drizzle with Kewpie mayonnaise and sprinkle a small amount of sesame seeds and bake at 180°C (fan forced) for 20-25 mins or until golden in colour.

Happy Baking.

29 comments:

  1. Oh wow, the loaf looks amazing good! Funny that I made some pork floss buns too and yet I'm still salivating over your bread, lol! :D

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  2. Your bread looks so fluffy and soft. I have not tried fish floss before! This would be great with a cup of coffee!

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  3. WOW!! i love those bread you baked!! it all look sooo delicious! and is so soft and fluffy! (: (:

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  4. the bread looks wonderfully soft!

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  5. I am a bread person and I'm bowled over by yours.

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  6. They look so fluffy. Mmmm... fish floss, never tried before. Just can't help salivating!

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  7. I hv not tried fish floss before. Is this as nice as pork floss?

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  8. Your bread looks so soft and nicely brown..

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  9. Hey Zoe! I'm definitely seduced by your fish floss bread! How soft it looks!!! and the fish flosss..oooooooooo....

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  10. This bread looks so good! Never heard of it before, but definitely willing to give it a try =)

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  11. your bread sure looks good, i think your bread making is getting better and better!! why the chicken floss in mel are denser? are they not the imported ones?

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  12. Omg, prefectly baked bread, simply irresistible!

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  13. I have no idea what fish or pork floss is, but it kinda sounds gross. But your bread looks delish! Please explain. lol

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  14. I like pork floss too, however i really don't know how fish floss taste like because we don't have fish floss selling here.

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  15. i think in the past, i've had pork floss confiscated at the quarantine :( i LOVE it also, i even add it to my oatmeal for brekkie sometimes lol or have with toast! this bread looks so enticing...glad to see another bread recipe from you :)

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  16. Hi Zoe,
    I'd like to try your recipe of fish floss buns since I'm practicing making buns. I want to ask if I can use grated cheese (grated emmental or cheddar or mozzarella cheese) instead of fish floss? Because my elder son loves cheese but he's not so interested in fish floss. If cheese could be used, then do I have to adjust baking time or temperature?

    Thank you for sharing.

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  17. T.T been having trouble leaving comments.
    Your bread looks absolutely tempting! I love the brown color! How did you get it? And thanks for sharing. =D

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  18. Thanks everyone for your nice comments.

    Lena: The pork / chicken floss breads sold in Asian bakery in Melbourne is not as fluffy as the ones I had in Singapore. The imported ones are usually from Taiwan or China and they are slightly different in texture from the ones made in Singapore. Maybe, I'm just used to the kind that I grew up with.

    Edith: I like both pork floss and fish floss and they are both as good in term of their taste. However, if I have to choose, I would choose the fish one simply because I like to eat fish more than pork.

    RPVN: I would prefer to use cheese as topping rather than fillings. When baking, the melting cheese will create a large hole inside the bun and will collapse again when it is cooled. I don't use cheese as filling but for this reason. The baking time and temperature is depending on the size of the bread or baking tin. I usually use 180°C (fan forced) and monitor the bread while baking. The bread is ready when I can see that they are perfectly browned.

    Jet: The brown colour is from the egg wash that I use. It has a mixture of egg yolk and milk in about 50:50 ratio.

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  19. Ooo, I love pork floss buns. All your bread looks so perfect. I never heard of fish floss, I'll have to keep an eye at it when I go to Chinatown. Thanks for sharing, Zoe!

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  20. Wow, looks so yummy! I love bread with chicken floss, want to try baking this also next time :)

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  21. Hi Zoe, The bread looks absolutely scumptious! May I know whether you mix the ingredient A & B with mixer or by hand? Thanks. Chloe

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    1. Hi Chloe,

      I normally knead ingredient A by hand and knead B by breadmaker or my KA. You can knead ingredient B by hand too but you have to make use that the dough has to develop well its elasticity.

      Cheers!

      Zoe

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    2. Thanks Zoe for your quick response. I think I will try using the hand mixer with dough hook. Hope it works too. I noticed you are in Melb, so I am wondering if you could find milk powder here in Aus (I am in Perth)? I think I have only seen baby's formulae milk in powder so far? Any substitute I can use? Thanks again.

      Cheers, Chloe

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    3. Hi Chloe,

      The milk powder that I'm using is Diploma instant. It can be commonly found in the aisle selling UHT milk or even next to coffee or evaporated and condensed milk.

      A hand mixer with a hook might be not powerful enough to knead bread dough and you might feel tired holding the mixer too long for the long kneading process. I would suggest mixing with a stand-mixer or worst... by hand. Remember that your bread dough has to be elastic in order to archive its ultimate soft and fluffy texture. Good luck!

      Zoe

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  22. Hi Zoe,

    Can I ask how long do you knead using KA? And on what speed? Did it reach the window pane stage? Is the dough still very sticky after kneading? Thank you.

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    1. Hi,

      Due to our current chilly winter, I usually knead my bread dough using bread maker for its temperature control. I used my KA too during summer and knead it at its lowest speed or at most speed 2. I usually knead it until elastic and usually 10-20 mins. The dough shouldn't be sticky for this recipe. Cheers!

      Zoe

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  23. Hi, do you where can i get all types of floss in Melbourne?
    Thanks heaps

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    1. Hi,

      You can find the imported ones (both pork and fish ones) selling at most Asian grocery stores. I have seen the fish ones as well and they are mostly imported from Taiwan. However, I reckon that they are not as good as the fish ones that I bought from Singapore.

      Zoe

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