Monday, August 20, 2012

Sfogliata (Italian Paprika and Anchovy Bread)

Last weekend was cold and rainy with not much sunshine at all... but we were very happy with this weather! We were at Mount Baw Baw which is about three hours drive from Melbourne. It was snowing when we got there and we were having fun tobogganing and snow fights. After all the intensive snow fights, we were all tired and hungry when we reached home at Melbourne...

We love eating anchovies especially when they are lightly toasted on pizzas. Now, seeing the description of this well-rated Epicurious recipe make me feel that I got to try baking this bread.

To know the origin and information of this bread, I tried to "Google" and translate this word, Sfogliata or "Sfogliata recipe". All I can gather is that the meaning of "Sfogliata" being “glance" or "look” and this Epicurious recipe being the only major hits of this search. I have not tried any authentic Italian sfogliata and would be able to know what kind of taste and texture that I'm after. All I know is this bread is extremely delicious! It is soft and tender inside, amazingly crispy at its bottom. Its every bite is full of "mouth-exploring" flavours.

Two important things to mention about this bread... One: I would strongly encourage to stick to the use of sweet Hungarian paprika to make this bread, otherwise you will need to reduce the amount of paprika if you are baking this spicy-intolerant eaters. Two: Depending on how I cut  this bread, its inside would have a few different looks. When I cut the bread lengthwise of the coil, I will have a long loopy swirl bread and when I cut directly into the coiled area, I will have a rounder swirl. So be aware of which way you cut your bread if you seeking for a particular look of this bread... In whatever particular ways, they all taste good!

sfogliata Italian paprika anchovy bread
Presenting my Sofgliata!
Ingredients for the seasoned oil
Making the bread
Cutting the bread lengthwise...
sfogliata Italian paprika anchovy bread
A perfect coil if cutting the bread directly at the coiled area...

Here's the recipe from Epicurious.
(with my modification and notes in blue)

For dough

3/4 cup warm water (105-115°F)
2 tsp active dry yeast
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup "00" flour
1 cup semolina flour
1 tsp salt

For seasoned oil

1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbsp sweet Hungarian paprika
1 tbsp chopped fresh oregano
4 canned flat anchovy fillets, drained, patted dry, and minced
(increased to 6)
1/2 tsp salt
(I didn't add this)

Make dough:
Stir together water and yeast in a small bowl until yeast is dissolved and let stand until foamy, about 5 min. (If mixture doesn't foam, discard and start over with new yeast.) Stir oil into yeast mixture. Pulse together "00" flour, semolina, and salt in a food processor until combined. With motor running, pour in yeast mixture and process until a wet dough forms. Transfer dough from bowl to a lightly floured surface and knead gently a few times until smooth. Form dough into a ball and transfer to an oiled large bowl, turning to coat. Cover bowl loosely with plastic wrap and a kitchen towel. Let dough rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until doubled in bulk, 1 to 1 1/2 hrs.

Make seasoned oil:

Whisk together all oil ingredients in a small bowl until combined well.

Form and bake sfogliata:
Lightly oil an 8-inch square baking pan. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead a few times to remove air. Roll out dough on a well-floured surface into a roughly 18-inch round (1/8-inch thick).

Reserve 1 tbsp seasoned oil and brush remaining oil over dough round, leaving a 1/4-inch border around edge. Tightly roll up dough jelly-roll style and pinch seam to seal (some filling will seep out as you roll). Arrange roll seam side down and form into a coil, then transfer to oiled pan. Gently press on coil to flatten slightly, then cover pan loosely with plastic wrap and a kitchen towel. Let rise at warm room temperature until doubled in bulk, about 1 hr.

Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 375°F (or 150°C fan forced). Brush top of dough with reserved oil and bake until pale golden and top and underside are crusty, 35 to 40 min. Lift bread from pan with a metal spatula and transfer, right side up, to cool completely on a rack, about 1 hr. Serve bread thinly sliced.

Happy Baking

Here are the nice memories that we had from our last weekend... Enjoy the scenes of our wintery August !

It was snowing when we arrived at Mount Baw Baw.
My son was pulling his toboggan.
Can you spot a man in this picture?

36 comments:

  1. Paprika and achovy bread, yum! Looks fantastic too.

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  2. It looks great in all the pictures from every angle :) Looks so soft and flavorful!

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  3. I love your breads Zoe always look amazing:))

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  4. Hi Zoe, love your holiday photos of the winter scene... its just so beautiful! This bread looks great, especially with the way it is rolled inside. I am sure it is very flavorful with the anchovies. I have never seen anchovies in tins in Singapore... my only knowledge of anchovies are those small dried ones that is used to boil soups. I wonder if the big tinned ones are called by another name here?

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    1. Hi Mich,

      Yes... Understand that most the anchovies in Singapore are the dried ones. You might be lucky to find the tinned ones at the Italian food section in some Cold Storage. I'm going back to Singapore in late Oct and if I see them, I will tell you :D I don't think there are other names for the tinned ones... I think they are also known as anchovies... but definitely not ikan bilis :D

      Zoe

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  5. I have never heard of sfogliata before. This looks so good I can only imagine how good it tastes.
    I love the snow photos...my daughter has only seen snow once in her 17 years.

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  6. Hi Zoe!

    First let me say your bread looks absolutely heavenly!!! I am quite curious about its heritage too. I have a few Italian cookbooks around here. When I get a chance I'm going to see what I can find too. If I find anything, I will be sure and let you know.

    Thank you so much for sharing, I can just image the delicious fragrance...

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  7. Cute snowman!

    Is the texture of the bread similar to foccacia?

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    1. Hi Baby Sumo,

      This bread is quite unique in its texture. It is soft at its inside but crispy on its bottom. Not spongy at all like some foccacia.

      Zoe

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  8. Oh that bread looks amazing and your snow pictures are awesome!

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  9. Looks delicious, another entry to my to bake list :)

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  10. That bread has me imagining lots off combinations *beside anchovy ;)
    and I am loving the snow pics - makes me miss it!

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  11. great post!Really beautifully made this sfogliata. How funny being in the snow in August. Lovely photographs.

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  12. This recipe is unique and different I never thought use anchovi for baking a bread,sound tasty !!

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  13. Looks so tender, Zoe! I love the idea of using anchovies for the filling. Yum!

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  14. Zoe, I love your snowy holiday photos, must be very enjoyable, wish Spore will snow too hahaha...

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  15. It was so hot today I'm drooling over your snow!

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  16. Hi Zoe,
    Your bread looks delicious! Love savour bread like this. I have tried baking with canned anchovies once, they are a little pricey here and are only available at special stores.
    So jealous of your cool weather there. Here is extremely hot, luckily it rained these two days after weeks of dry spell!

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  17. Mount Baw Baw, what a cute name! Paprika+anchovy, what an interesting combination!

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  18. Lovely photographs! Sfogliata looks like a very unique kind of bread. Would love to try this with some Indian flavours also. I think tandoori chicken or kheema will make a nice flavour for the filling. LOL! dont worry I wont spoil your sfogliata by over stuffing it.

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  19. This is my kind of bread ! And I have yet to make another one :P :D The idea of using anchovies as a filling sounds fantastic ! Yup , your bread , as always looks WONDERFUL !

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  20. Not only it sounds delicious but looks tasty too. I can imagine all the flavor combo in this bread! Marvelous! BTW love the cute snowman & all the lovely pictures! Awesome post :)

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  21. this looks and sounds so wonderfully savory and delicious! love it!

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  22. What a beautiful bread, Zoe! I love anchovies and I bet they add the perfect saltiness to this bread! You are such an amazing baker! And I loved the wintery scenes! : )

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  23. quite a unique look of the bread. i havent not tried canned anchovies tho they are available here, i must go and get a can and see how they taste like. Man in that picture? i saw 2 men. one is snowman and the other one is your gingerbread man trademark:)

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    1. You are right, Lena! There are 2 men in the picture. The prize for your right guess is lots of hugs and kisses from me... LOL!

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  24. I never heard of Sfogliata...but from your description and pictures I know that must taste delicious, especially that I love anchovy...which I cannot say for my husband heheheh!
    The pictures of your Aug winter is very refreshing since we are toasting in summer heat.
    Thanks for sharing this wonderful recipe and hope you are having a great week :)

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  25. Your bread looks delicious, crusty and full of flavor. I can just imagine how good it is fresh from the oven! Looks like a great time in the snow :)

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  26. I don't think I've ever had anchovies in bread before! Why didn't I know about this?! I love anchovies. Really very interesting - this must be wonderful. Thanks for introducing me to this.

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  27. Is there anything better than freshly baked bread? Doesn't it make your house smell incredible :) Yummy recipe!

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  28. Hi Zoe,
    Love the texture of the bread in your pictures. It not the fluffy and spongey type right?
    My friend gave me some can anchovies, i was thinking of what to cook or bake with them. Now i know what to do after seeing your sfogliata. I don't think i can find Hungarian paprika here, can i use those from McCormick instead?

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    1. Hi Doreen,

      This bread is soft inside and not spongy at all with a crispy bottom.

      The recipe would highly recommend the use of sweet Hungarian paprika because other typical paprika might caused the bread too spicy to taste. If you reduce the amount of paprika, you will not have enough reddish colour swirl in your bread.

      Zoe

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