Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Very Moist and Soft Japanese Milk Square Toast Bread / Shokupan 食パン

As mentioned at here, remember I said that the enzymes in milk can break down gluten and prevent the bread dough from rising. Due to this reason, some bread recipes prefer to use scalded milk because scalding milk deactivates these enzymes.

It is true. I have baked this recipe many times with either pasteurized milk (not scaled) or milk powder with water and the different ingredients used produce significant differences in bread rising.

Ultimately, this is one of the most perfect shokupan that I had baked...


moist soft Japanese milk bread shokupan
A very moist and soft Japanese shokupan

At first, I baked two square loaves with 600g bread flour, 60g milk powder and 430ml of water and yielded these two perfect square loaves! Lovely!

Shokupan made with milk powder and water

However, the original recipe from from Cookpad uses milk that doesn't require scalding and so, the curious me baked another two square loaves with 600g bread flour and 430ml of milk and yielded two almost square loaves!!!

Shokupan made with un-scalded milk and didn't rise maximally

See! This bread theory is right! There is something in un-scalded milk that can break down gluten and prevent the dough from rising!!!

However, the bread made with milk is moister and softer than the ones made with milk powder and so, I have scaled up this recipe slightly to bake these two perfect square loaves.

Can you imagine that un-scaled MILK is actually the magic ingredient to make this bread extra moist and fluffy? Geez! I'm loving these baking sciences and theories.

To be honest, we really don't mind baking eating these breads with either milk powder or pasteurised milk. All are nice and fluffy but ultimately, I like to highly recommend this recipe as it is ...

This recipe uses a combination of oil (or shortening) and butter.
Using a breadmaker, I have kneaded this dough with smooth and white surfaces.
Then, I shaped portions of it into rolls.
... and placed them into greased loaf pans for final proving.
After baking ...
Besides using different oven temperature, I have noticed that the use of non-stick pan yields fairer crust.
... but both are as moist, soft and fluffy!

Here's the recipe that is mostly adapted from Cookpad

Make one 10cm x 20cm or 450g loaf

Recipe that uses pasteurised milk - This is the one that I would highly recommend!!! - slightly denser but very moist and soft
350g bread flour
20g caster sugar
6g salt
255ml milk*, at room temperature
15g unsalted butter, soften at room temperature plus extra to grease
12ml vegetable oil, preferably something healthy with no trans fat and low in saturated fat
1 1/4 tsp instant dry yeast

*The milk in this recipe doesn't require scalding but need to be lukewarm or at least room temperature for efficient proving.

To clarify further, the pasteurised milk that I'm referring is NOT UHT (Ultra Heat Treated). It is also known as fresh milk that we store in the fridge for a limited period of time as they are pasteurised (or heated) to 72°C for 15 secs and are found in the fridge sections of all supermarkets.

Recipe that uses milk powder - This recipe is good too which yields slightly fluffier bread with slightly darker crust
300g bread flour
18g caster sugar
5g salt
30g milk powder
215ml water, at room temperature
10g unsalted butter, soften at room temperature plus extra to grease
10ml vegetable oil, preferably something healthy with no trans fat and low in saturated fat
1 tsp instant dry yeast

Using a breadmaker, mix all dough ingredients and knead into a smooth and elastic dough and allow it to prove for 1 hr.

If breadmaker is not available, kneading by electric mixer with a dough hook is possible. Using an electric mixer with low mixing speed, mix all dough ingredients (except butter) to form a dough first. Then, mix in the unsalted butter and keep kneading at medium low speed until dough is smooth and elastic. Transfer dough into a large bowl and cover it with a cling wrap. Allow the dough to rise for 1 hr or until doubled in size.

Grease Pullman loaf pan with butter or spraying oil.

To shape, divide dough into 3 portions and shape each into balls. Allow them to rest at room temperature for about 10 mins

Roll each portion into long and flat oval shape (about 20 cm). Fold the left and right sides to the middle overlapping the edges slightly. Then, roll it again into a Swiss roll shape.

Place three of the shaped dough with their seams side down into the prepared pan. Press the top of the dough lightly to form an even surface.

Cover the loaf with a cling wrap and allow it to prove for another 1 hr or until it has 2 cm more to reach the maximum height of the loaf pan.

Options for baking:

1) If you use a square (shokupan) loaf pan, close the lid of the pan. For a rounded-top bread, leave as it is as no brushing of egg wash or milk is required.


2) If you prefer bread with slightly darker crust, preheat the oven to 200°C or 180°C fan forced and bake the bread for 15 mins. Then, decrease the temperature to 180°C or 160°C fan forced for another 15 mins.

3) If you prefer bread with lighter crust, preheat the oven to 180°C or 160°C fan forced and bake the bread for 30 mins.

4) If you prefer bread with the lightest crust, use loaf pans with non-stick surface.

When the bread is baked, unmould the bread immediately. Transfer bread on a wire rack to cool it completely. Slice and serve!

Happy Baking
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44 comments:

  1. Very very soft and fluffy bread indeed.. Milky yummy bread, love it.. You always make very lovely breads Zoe, I can have a whole loaf! No, make that 3 loafs! Haha..

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  2. Hi ZOE,
    Love this prefect bread of yours.
    The crust was nicely brown and the texture is soft like a pillow. Hehe
    Can I have a piece for breakfast? : p
    mui

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  3. Lovely loaves Zoe, I have always like baking bread,these looks great especially the first ones...beautiful color!

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  4. very nicely baked up square toast Zoe... love to grab a loaf off ya

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  5. This is interesting and very well explained. Thanks for sharing

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  6. Good day, Zoe. You baked such beautiful bread. I can see it so fluffy and soft. I can just eat it on its own.

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  7. Beautiful, beautiful bread. I can smell them from here! :)

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  8. Is the first picture (showing slices of bread) using warmed pasterised milk without having the need to scald before mixing with the rest of the ingredients? It really looks mouth-watering.
    I wonder what would be the result if using tangzhong method with the same recipe.

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    Replies
    1. Hi,

      Yes that you are right that the bread in this first picture is one of the breads that I have baked using un-scaled milk at room temperature.

      I have not try to incorporate the tangzhong method to bake this recipe yet but at this moment, I don't think the additional tangzhong method is not really necessary as this loaf itself is soft and fluffy enough. If you think tangzhong can enhance this recipe, please let me know :)

      Zoe

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  9. hi Zoe.. these are truly looking so soft :) you are marvelous in baking gal

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  10. wow... just look at that bread... looks so soft and fluffy...

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  11. Zoe, wow looks delicious and soft!

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  12. Zoe, I love soft fluffy bread like this! I used to buy this Japanese bread loaf from the bakery but they were quite pricey.

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  13. Thanks for the recipe Zoe. I must try to make this soon. And thanks for the tip regarding scalded and un-scalded milk in bread making.

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  14. Oh Zoe what beautiful loaves of bread , they look delicious dear . Nee

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  15. I love these look perfect and delicious Zoe!!

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  16. It's amazing recipe
    Happy 2015!
    bye

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  17. I love this recipe! I sometime crave for shokupan. I'm going to try it!

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  18. Oh my gosh, Zoe, just look at all the delicious experimenting you did, I give you so much credit for "playing" with "baking sciences and theories," lol...

    You know how bad I am at baking any kind of bread with or eithout milk, lol...I'd love to try this one though:)

    Thank you so much for sharing, Zoe...

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  19. Hi Zoe
    If using loaf pan with non-stick surface, do i need to cover the top with foil? Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Kin,

      Sorry that I don't really understand your question. To clarify, you don't have to cover the bread with foil id you are baking the bread with no pullman cover.

      Cheers!

      Zoe

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  20. Hi Zoe,
    May I know whether 'pasteurised milk' is also known as UHT milk ( milk not does not need to be kept in the fridge)?
    If I read correctly, U are suggesting the use of pasteurised milk rather than fresh milk to make this bread soft n fluffy?

    Thank U
    Sabrina

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    Replies
    1. Hi Sabrina,

      The pasteurised milk that I was referring is not the UHT (Ultra Hight temperatured) treated ones. They are also known as fresh milk from the fridge.

      Thanks for asking this question and I will include this details in the above recipe.

      Zoe

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  21. This looks amazing Zoe! I would rip into that loaf and eat it plain! I'm a huge fan as many singaporeans are of soft, milky slightly sweet bread! With basic bread making knowledge bread isn't too difficult and that's why my boyfriend likes breads whereas I can't be bothered! I prefer my stove for cooking!

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  22. I'm learning something new. I didn't know that milk affects the bread rising. The bread loaves look so soft and moist. I'll have to try it out.

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  23. Hi Zoe,
    This milky loaf is so fluffy soft. Well ... too complicated for me to bake this leh ... I'll just admire your post ... the beautiful bread ^-^!

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  24. oh yumm these look so soft and delicious way better than the bread we get from the bakeries here.

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  25. Really interesting discussion -- I love how you experiment with recipes, ingredients, procedures, etc. This bread is gorgeous -- and I'm sure quite delish. Thanks!

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  26. Gorgeous bread, Z. You're a master at baking.
    I have a cookbook giveaway at the moment & will ship to Oz if you win! xo

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  27. This looks amazing. Ive been keeping an eye out for a pullman loaf pan but haven't managed to track one down yet.

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  28. Beautiful bread Zoe...I too am trying many recipes from Cookpad...thanks for the information about the scalded milk...most of the time I use dry milk and whole cream...therefore I assume that whole cream might have the same effect as the milk...any thoughts? Thanks!

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  29. Hi Zoe! I tried baking the bread but it turned out sour-y. Wondered what went wrong. :( Loved the texture of the bread though! Thanks for your recipe!!!

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    Replies
    1. Hi,

      The bread shouldn't taste sourish. Have you checked if your milk is ok?

      Zoe

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  30. Hi Zoe. the fresh milk I used was taken out from the fridge to be at SG room temperature. I don't think the problem came from the milk though! Thanks for your response!!!! :-)

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  31. Hi, just wandering have you try this recipe with additional of egg? Other Shokupan recipe contains egg...Thank you

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    Replies
    1. Hi,

      I have not tried this recipe with the addition of egg. If you like to bake with the "Shokupan" recipes with the addition of eggs, you might like to try these fantastic sandwich bread recipes that I have baked before and they contain eggs:
      http://www.bakeforhappykids.com/2013/01/golden-sandwich-bread.html
      http://www.bakeforhappykids.com/2012/05/honey-white-bread-barefoot-contessa.html
      http://www.bakeforhappykids.com/2014/01/japanese-style-cheese-breads.html
      http://www.bakeforhappykids.com/2014/05/tang-zhong-wholemeal-milk-loaf.html

      Cheers!

      Zoe

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  32. Hello how many grams of oil needed? pls reply. thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Hi,

      10ml of oil is about 9g. 12ml is about 11g then. Cheers!

      Zoe

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    2. Hello Zoe, may I know the oil is to grease the tin or to be added together into the mix with the butter?

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    3. Hi Charlene,

      This is the amount of oil added to mix with the butter in the bread dough. Cheers!

      Zoe

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  33. Hi Zoe, Thanks for the recipe. I made 1 loaf early in the day and was so good made another one later in the day. I like to purchase the same loaf pan that you are showing. I saw in Amazon.com that the Pullman bread pans has the lines and yours is smooth. Can you please tell me where to get them and the size? Available online? Thanks so much.

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    Replies
    1. Hi, I bought my pullman pans in Singapore and sorry that I can't remember the shop that I went.

      You can buy the pans via online at ebay and Amazon but I'm not sure if the size and quality of their pans are like mine. Cheers!

      Zoe

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    2. Thanks Zoe for replying the my message. I will keep checking on the baking stores. It's time to bake some bread ;-)
      Happy Baking.

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