Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Best Chinese Steamed Bun Recipe to make Wonderfully White and Soft Red Bean Steamed Buns / Dou Sha Bao 豆沙包


Remember that Google image search has convinced my husband to convince me to steam white fluffy red bean buns using the bao recipe from Happy Home Baking.

Thanks to Google image search, my husband (the Google King) and Happy Home Baking! It is true that this bao recipe from Happy Home Baking is really really really good! It is actually a basic bao recipe containing basic ingredients like bleached flour, water and minimal amount of baking powder, yeast and oil and yet it can produce wonderfully, white, soft and fluffy professional kind of steamed buns.

In short, I would highly recommend this recipe!!! I reckon this is one of the best steamed bun recipe that I have found!!! If you like to make your own steamed buns, you must try this recipe!!!

Red Bean Steamed Buns Dou sha bao
Red bean steamed Buns 豆沙包 made with my healthiest homemade red bean paste

To the health freak me, these steamed buns with healthiest kind of red bean filling is my kind of 豆沙包 but my son reckon that the red bean filling is not sweet or flowy enough for him... Whether you are using red bean filling that is sweet or flowy or not, I can't stop saying that this bao recipe is the kind of steamed buns that you won't want to miss!!!

These are bao making absolute essentials - Hong Kong flour and canola oil
This is the healthiest red bean paste that I have made at here.
Divide paste to 20g each and dough to 40g each
Wrap, shape and steam them...
15 minutes of steaming and the buns are ready!
I'm loving every single bit of our very-homemade red bean buns.

Here is the wonderfully white steamed buns recipe that is mostly adapted from Happy Home Baking which is quite similar to another great red bean steamed buns by Chin's Baking Diary

Intentionally, everything is 3 in the original recipe but I have scaled it up to use 500g of flour to use up the whole packet of Hong Kong flour and make extra buns. This recipe with 500g of flour yields 19-20 buns. 20 buns!!! That's heaps to feed a small family. Yes that I did this intentionally so that I can keep the extra in the freezer and steam them whenever I want just like what we always do with the commercial frozen kinds.

Makes 20 buns

500g Hong Kong flour (1 pack) or any low protein (7-9%) bleached flour 
1 1/4 tsp baking powder, preferably double acting baking powder
1 1/4 tsp instant yeast
1/4 cup (50g) caster sugar
265ml (1 cup + 1 tbsp) water
25ml vegetable oil, preferably something light like canola oil

400g red bean paste

Place water, oil, sugar, flour, baking powder and yeast according to this order into a breadmaker and use "dough” setting to knead and prove the dough for 1 hr.

If breadmaker is not available, kneading by hand is possible. Combine flour, baking powder, yeast, sugar in a mixing bowl. Make a well in the flour mixture, add water and oil mix to form a dough. Transfer dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Knead to form an elastic and smooth dough (at least 20 mins) and then let it rise for 1 hr. Please note that HHB has mentioned 15 mins of proving is sufficient for her but I left my dough to rise for at least an hour.

When the dough is ready, divide into 20 portions. Flatten each dough pieces with your hands or roll it slightly with a rolling pin. Place about 20g of red bean paste. Wrap and seal the sides of the dough to completely enclose the filling. Place each bun on each paper cup liner or a small piece of baking paper with its seam sides down. Rest the bun in warm mist for 20 mins.


While waiting, if you are using the stove for steaming, set water to boil for the steaming later. Steam bun for about 12-20 mins until done. The steam timing varies if you have multiple layers of baos to steam. The layer that is closest to the direct steam will take 15 mins to cook. When ready remove the buns immediately from the steamer and serve warm.

Leftovers can be kept in fridge or freezer with cling wrap and cover. To freeze, allow buns to cool completely at room temperature. Wrap each bun in each small freezing bag and place them in the freezer. To consume, no thawing of frozen buns is required. Just re-steam the kept buns until hot before serve.

Happy Steaming
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Before going, I like to emphasize again that I'm loving this steamed buns recipe!!! Here, I like to mention that this recipe works well to make Liu Sha Bao too. See this if you wish to know how to make Liu Sha Bao filling.

If you are using this steamed bun recipe to make Liu Sha Bao, please DO NOT steam your buns for more than 14 minutes!!! Otherwise, the custard filling will explode out of the bao.

Liu Sha Bao custard steamed buns
Liu Sha Bao made with this steamed bun recipe - Yum!!!

Although these steamed buns are not exactly a Chinese New Year delicacy, we are enjoying these buns to its fullest on Chinese New Year too.

34 comments:

  1. I know this dau sar pao post would be coming.. As usual, your paos look so nice, soft and yummy, ooooo and look at that liu sha pao, oozing custard, I want 10!

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  2. So light and fluffy! I'd love your homemade filling I'm sure. :)

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  3. I love these Zoe!! Look delicious!!

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  4. Hi Zoe, thank you for sharing my favourite red bean pao....especially homemades ones...yum yum!

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  5. very nice buns.. and i love your shaping.. you know, the filling sits right in the middle of the bao... professional!

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  6. Okie dokie, Zoe! Let's see if I have enough motivation to make pao!

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  7. Gorgeous! You really make great chinese bakery goodies! I personally like red bean in sweet soups and in the fried crispy pancake but not so much in a bun like this although yours look stunning!

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  8. Hi Zoe,
    Homemade baos are always the best ! Made me drool over these soft fluffy steamed baos^-^!

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  9. Hi Zoe , love these , will try my hand at making some , so light and the filling is prefect . :)

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  10. oh I miss these . My favorite filling. yumm. by the way will it be different if I use regular flour?

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    1. Hi Nammi,

      If you like your bao to be snowy and finer in texture. you have to use bleached and finely milled flour like Hong Kong Flour. If you are not fussy with its overall texture and look, you can use all purpose flour to make this buns too.

      Zoe

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  11. Oh Zoe, your homemade baos look awesome...love the texture and the fluffiness of it...beautifully done!
    Enjoy your week :)

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  12. Wow! One of my favorite snack! Your buns look fluffy and professional! I think I have to soak azuki beans tonight. Love the individual bamboo steamer! And also love the electric steamer you can see the progress, very cool!

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  13. Oh Zoe, if you only knew how badly I would like to try those steam buns. If you could just toss one my way I would be soooooo happy!!!

    Thank you so much for sharing, Zoe...I think I will just need to dream about their delicious taste:)

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  14. Hi Zoe,
    Your buns looks very fluffy! Would love to try this someday!
    I've just linked for your CNY event!

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  15. I love steamed buns, and yours are gorgeous! Really good stuff -- thanks.

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  16. These are amazing, Zoe. I like that you always leave us tips too! ^.^

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  17. Hi Zoe,
    Is this a new product from the little cafe in the corner of Melbourne :p
    Yes agreed with the others, your shaping look so Pro. Love the loaded red bean filling that sits in the 'center' of the Bao. Simply beautiful!
    mui

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  18. Do we need to proof bun for an hour?

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    1. Hi Vinita,

      Yes you need to prove the dough until it doubles in size (about 1 hr) before shaping and need to rest the buns until they look puffy after shaping.

      Zoe

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  19. Hi
    After putting in the fillings, do I have to wait for the bun to proof some more before steaming ?

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    1. Hi Debbie,

      Yes. With the help of warm mist, I have proofed the buns for 20 mins until they look puffy before steaming them.

      Zoe

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  20. Hi Zoe, if we don't have bread maker, can we use the recipe for the buns? Thank you :)

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    1. Hi! Sure you can. You can use an electric mixer or your hand to knead until the dough is smooth and elastic (about 20 mins). Important that the dough has to be smooth and elastic!

      Zoe

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  21. Hi Zoe, have you tried baking it instead of steam? Can I use the same recipe to achieve a "baked" bun effect?

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    1. Hi, you can't use this recipe to bake the buns. This recipe suitable for steaming only.

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  22. Hello zoe...

    I ve tried this recipy of yours,but i find d dough was too sticky n hard to handle..

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    1. Hi, the dough made from the recipe should not be too sticky to handle. I'm pretty sure that you have used the wrong amount of ingredients. Cheers!

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    2. Actually that baffles me as i followed ur recipe strictly, (i m not a good cook btw), i still manage to shape the dough round but i had to sprinkle other flour first and i had to shape it really fast. Maybi know how d dough texture should really be? Anyhow,tq..

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    3. Hi,

      To confirm my answer again, the dough made from the recipe should NOT be too sticky to handle. Cheers!

      Zoe

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  23. Hi Zoe,

    I'm keen to try out your recipe here to make the bun dough for greater quantity of Liu sha pau. I want make 20 instead of 12 as proposed under your Liu Sha Pau recipe.

    Should I follow the proportion here for the red bean pau?

    Also, I intend to use bread maker to make the dough. I read from other recipes that they mix the water with yeast first and pour the yeast mixture with water last after mixing the flour together with the dry ingredients. I'm wondering if this would be different from yours which is easier? Just pour everything in order... Haha!
    Will the texture of the buns be different using different method of mixing using the bread maker?

    Thank you!

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    1. Hi Evelyn,

      Sorry that I have not worked out the amount of ingredients that I need in order to prepare enough bao dough and filling to make 20 Liu Sha Bao. I might work out something to write another blog post soon but I have not done anything yet. My apology.

      To answer your second question, it is important to add water first then the other ingredients if you use a breadmaker to knead the bao dough. You can add the yeast after the addition of water or last and both ways are ok. For me, my standard practice is always adding my yeast last so that I know I have added my yeast! :)

      If you are living in places that are cold and need temperature controlled mixing, it is better to use bread maker to knead these yeast-leaven dough. Otherwise, kneading using electric mixer, bread maker or even by hand wouldn't make any differences if your dough are properly kneaded until it is elastic and smooth.

      I hope you will have fun making these buns.

      Zoe

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  24. Hi Zoe,
    Is the "warm mist" process in the Tefal mini steamer function?
    So, in order to get the warm mist in stove, i should turn on the stove sith low heat (not until the water boils) for 20 minutes...is that correct?


    Thank You

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    Replies
    1. Hi Alice, All you need to do is to place warm water in the steamer and let the buns rest until they are puffy. Please do not turn on any heat. Cheers!

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